Heavenly Reunions

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Credit: Marshall Ramey/Clarion-Ledger, 2018.

Today, I want to talk about a man who I have never met but who I respect greatly and gladly call a friend. Marshall Ramsey is the editorial cartoonist for the Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Mississippi. He’s not originally from the magnolia state but has been adopted as one of our own due to his love for our state (even when we don’t agree with him) and for his heart of gold. Marshall is a skin cancer survivor and strives to live every day that God grants him in this world to the fullest. His Christian faith enables him to highlight hope in the midst of death and tragedy. He recently caused a huge wave with one of his recent drawings, which you likely saw when you clicked to read this post.

Marshall’s drawing of Barbara Bush being reunited with her daughter Robin – she died from leukemia at age 3, something I did not know before – in heaven has made the rounds from everywhere from NBC’s Today to Fox News and all points in between. The Bush family saw his drawing and reached out to him to express their appreciation for such a touching tribute. They now have the original drawing, prints, and awestruck surprise from Marshall. To say the least, this drawing has gotten people all over the world talking. Perhaps you want to know why this drawing has caused such a stir, aside from being a beautiful tribute. Well, the reason is simple:

Hope.

I’m a father who has lost a child. My daughter, Hannah, died soon after she was born. When I saw this drawing, tears came to my eyes because it made me think of my own daughter. These tears were not of sadness. Marshall’s drawing was a reminder that there will be a day of resurrection. I don’t know if reunions like the one depicted take place; the bible is vague at best as to whether or not such a scene would play out and not many people agree on one interpretation. But let’s put theology and doctrine aside for a moment. I have hope that I will see my daughter again. I have the promise that there will be a resurrection of the faithful and that my daughter will be among those who are raised. In short, I will see her again. I know I will. And Marshall gave me and all of those who are in the grim fraternity of those who have lost children a reminder that death is not the final answer and that we will be reunited with our children once more.

We have hope and we have the assurance that resurrection is coming. What joy!

Thank you, Marshall. Thank you for being one of the best things about Mississippi. Thank you for spreading hope. And most of all, thank you for allowing God to work through you to bring a reminder of his love, comfort, and compassion in such a meaningful way.

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Pastoral Thoughts on the Wet/Dry Vote in Powell County

cross-grave-cemetery-tombstone-161136.jpegMy brothers and sisters,

I greet you all in the name of Jesus Christ and I hope that this writing finds you all well.

As you all know, Powell County is at a crossroads. Soon, we will go to the polls and decide our primary elections as well as whether or not to allow liquor and beer sales within the county. I realize that we all have our opinions on the issue – I have mine as well. I believe that scripture teaches that drunkenness is a sin (Ephesians 5:18, Romans 13:13, Galatians 5:21) but as far as scripture’s teaching of consumption of alcohol in general, there is a mix of interpretations. At least today, I will not get into that. When it comes to the wet/dry vote, I feel there is something else that needs to be said right now.

I have been made aware by some members of the community that there is a campaign of harassment and shame being waged against some of the people who signed the petition to have the wet/dry issue placed on the ballot. I also know that there have been letters sent to at least a few pastors in the county – one of whom is me – suggesting that any pastor who does not participate with this group is not really a Christian. The tactics being employed by this group of both lay and clergy persons are disturbing on many levels. I believe that their tactics are harmful and hurt the witness of the Christians in Powell County. Further, I do not believe that such tactics are characteristic of a follower of Jesus Christ and is doing more harm than good.

I ask my brothers and sisters who are involved with this group to carefully consider the teachings and example of the Lord in such matters. One such example is found in John 8 when Jesus stops a mob from stoning a woman who had committed adultery. Jesus simply causes the members of this mob to examine the conditions of their own souls: “Let the one who has never sinned throw the first stone!” (John 8:7b NLT) Another teaching that Jesus gave that speaks to this is found in Matthew 7.

“Do not judge others, and you will not be judged. 2 For you will be treated as you treat others. The standard you use in judging is the standard by which you will be judged.[b]

“And why worry about a speck in your friend’s eye[c] when you have a log in your own? How can you think of saying to your friend, ‘Let me help you get rid of that speck in your eye,’ when you can’t see past the log in your own eye? Hypocrite! First get rid of the log in your own eye; then you will see well enough to deal with the speck in your friend’s eye.” (Matthew 7:1-5 NLT)

I’m sad to say that this group is reminding me more of the Pharisees than of a group of concerned followers of Jesus Christ.

Brothers and sisters, we can and should advocate for our beliefs. I have no issue with that. My issue is the method by which this is being done. We can not allow our passion for an issue to allow us to resort to fear and shame in order to make our point. This is not Christ-like behavior and will only contribute to the stereotype that Christians are judgemental and hateful. I urge you all to please reevaluate the tactics being used and consider employing other methods. Jesus said, “Your love for one another will prove to the world that you are my disciples” (John 13:35 NLT).

Paul wrote in his second letter to the Corinthians: “So we are Christ’s ambassadors; God is making his appeal through us. We speak for Christ when we plead, ‘Come back to God!’” (2 Corinthians 5:20 NLT) Brothers and sisters, we must remember that we represent Christ with everything that we say, think, and do when we claim the name “Christian.” We will not win souls with shame and hateful tones of voice. That’s not how Jesus ministered to the woman at the well and so many others. Let everything we do in the name of God be done with nothing but love… And let’s mean it.

In Christ,

Rev. Jonathan Tullos
Christian, Disciple, Pastor of Shiloh UMC Stanton, KY